Hyena hide-out

September 8th, 2018, posted in Creatures Great & Small, Wildlife

It is always rewarding to see a den with little ones, and this sighting of Hyena was no exception!

Lazy Lion

September 6th, 2018, posted in Creatures Great & Small, Wildlife

The following images of a Lion where taken on Thanda Safari.

Elephant a slimmer view

September 6th, 2018, posted in Creatures Great & Small, Wildlife

Elephant browsing in the late afternoon sun

This Elephant looks slimmer than it actually is, the angle of the photo combine with the bend in the road leads your eye to the left.
Note the toenails. This was such a great ending to a lovely day.

A bushwalk in Zululand

July 5th, 2018, posted in Tracks, Wildlife

Trail FAQ’s

January 17th, 2018, posted in FAQ's

FAQ’s (Frequently asked questions)

What is the best time of year to go on a Trail safari?

Generally the cooler months are easier to walk in so stick to April – September)

What is included in a Trail Safari?

Food, juice, water for your pack bladder/water bottles, a guided experience whilst on trail and accommodation of your choice at night with Dinner

Is there an age limit?

Generally speaking all fit persons between the age of 16 and 60 years are free to book, guests older than 60 years will only be considered on special request and subject to the Trail guide’s approval.

How safe is a Trail Safari?

It is never safe to walk where wild animals walk, this is why the Trails guide is properly qualified and walks with you. A Trail safari is a high risk activity and guests must be aware of the danger of walking amidst any wild animal.

Thorn trees

November 23rd, 2017, posted in Flora, Wildlife


Sometimes, at the end of the day when you are appreciating the thorn trees, gentle giants pass by, it is at these times, when i realise taking time to appreciate the thorn trees can have added benefits!

A new world

October 11th, 2017, posted in Uncategorized

We’ve entered into a new part of South Africa, with springs that feed streams and a kloof to conserve.  As we learn more about the plants and animals of this region, we hope to share it with you…

Eye of the Beholder

April 26th, 2012, posted in Creatures Great & Small, Wildlife

We all enjoy the early morning sun’s rays and on this morning Pieter found this Boomslang in its wooden dwelling waiting for the sun’s rays to get a little warmer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A couple of months later, out on a limb, well almost – more like the most slender of Acacia tree branches – this Boomslang watched Pieter intently.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is at these moments that you wonder what a human looks like to a snake…

What else does the Boomslang perceive the human race to be?

We continue to support Nature reserves, wilderness areas, game parks and farms for there is plenty to experience, so much for the soul and even more to see, our conservation passion lies not only in the eye of the beholder…                        but also what the naked eye does not see!

Elephants

March 6th, 2012, posted in Creatures Great & Small, Wildlife

It’s all about the Elephants

Last week I chatted to a lady who said the only reason why she came to Africa was to see Elephants. I found this very interesting as most tourists come to see as much as they can, researches and students would come for a specific animal, but not the normal tourist and that got me thinking – so what is a ‘normal tourist’?

I chose to blog about that too and you can read about The Normal Tourist soon!

To get back to the Elephants, as I started thinking about this enormous animals and where I’ve seen and watched them, I realized that I too must have some abserd fascination with Elephants because as I went through my photo album over the last two years – the majority of my photo’s are of elephants.

These are a selection of photographs I’ve taken of Elephants and the reasons (if any) I took the pictures.

The 5-legged elephant!

Elephant with an ear-piercing!

Elephant mothers and their babies!

Elephant feeding on grass under the level of water in lake Kariba!

Elephants take a mud bath in camp!

This is not a circus - this is how they do it in the Wild!

Unusual angle - take a look at that mouth!

Ele trying to squeeze the chlorine out of the water !

Meet Stumpy

Mutation in the genes can cause stunted growth

Joshua noticed the short trunk before I did!

Simply watching and making memories!

Dodge the Dung!

December 15th, 2011, posted in Creatures Great & Small, Educating You

I’m driving on the game reserve, slowly looking at the bright new colours of the leaves in the bush, hoping to catch a glimpse of a bird. I take my time, the road is gravel and we’re not in a rush anyway – Pieter and Joshua are on the back and all of a sudden I hear “Dodge the Dung!”

I look at the road and swerve – missing the elephant dung by an inch or two.  Not very responsible for a nature conservationist!  Alas, I had been too busy admiring the environment, rather than concentrating on where I was driving!  Thus the blog about dodging the dung!

After good rains in South Africa (end October/November), the dung beetles arrive in full force – collecting fresh dung as food and/or as nurseries!

You’ll find a variety of dung beetles hard at work rolling dung balls – if you are driving and watching where you drive 🙂 you’ll see them on the road – both tar and gravel, if you’re on a game path – you’ll see them along the path and if you are staying on a game reserve – then they’ll be wherever there is a fresh pile of dung! 

Dung beetles play an important role in the ecosystem – cleaning up animal waste and converting it into a ball that sustains their life!

Dung beetles are of the Family Scarabaeidae. This family of beetles are easily recognised by their antennae, which have an apical club of 3-7 flat, expanded, moveable plates that can open out fanwise.

Unlike their cousins (the Chafer’s), Dung beetles are all highly beneficial to their environment!  My son welcomes these busy creatures each season when his chore of “poop-scooping” is taken away by the dung beetles. They don’t seem to mind using doggy-doo either, as long as it’s dung, it gets rolled up in ball and rolled away!

Checking direction before continuing to roll the ball of dung

Large copper dung beetle

 
 
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